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The day a grenade exploded at my feet should have scared   me. Instead, it made me more determined. One life lost cannot erase the memory of 40,000 who per-ished during the dictatorship of president Hissene Habre in Chad. Whether it was me or someone else, I knew that one day those who were stolen from their families, tortured and beaten, would see justice.

From 1982 until 1990, Habre ruled my country of birth, Chad, after coming to power through a military coup. Through fear and intim-idation, assisted by his secret police, the Documentation and Security Directorate (DDS), he rounded up thousands of citi-zens, many of whom were then killed or "disappeared," until he was deposed by another coup and exiled to Senegal. It would take nearly 30 years be-fore he was brought to trial.


Alioune Tine, Director, West and Central Africa Regional OfficePresident Alpha Conde, Chairman, African Union Amnesty International

Representatives from leading civil society organizations, professional associations, governments, African Union (AU), academia, and key media leaders in West Africa are scheduled to participate in a two-day consultation on the Malabo Protocol in Dakar from 2-3 May, 2017.

The Malabo Protocol or the “Protocol on Amendments to the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights” was adopted by AU Assembly of Heads of State and Government in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, in June 2014.

The Protocol extends the jurisdiction of the yet to be established African Court of Justice and Human Rights (ACJHR) to try crimes under international law and transnational crimes, meaning that, if and when the new court becomes operational, the international criminal law section of the court will serve as an African regional criminal court, operating in a manner akin to the International Criminal Court (ICC) but within a narrowly defined geographical scope, and over an expanded list of crimes.

The two-day consultation, which is on the theme “Understanding the Malabo Protocol: The potential, the pitfalls and the way forward”, is organized by Amnesty International, IHRDA, RADDHO, and TrustAfrica.


Alioune Tine, Director, West and Central Africa Regional OfficePresident Alpha Conde, Chairman, African Union Amnesty International

Representatives from leading civil society organizations, professional associations, governments, African Union (AU), academia, and key media leaders in West Africa are scheduled to participate in a two-day consultation on the Malabo Protocol in Dakar from 2-3 May, 2017.

The Malabo Protocol or the “Protocol on Amendments to the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights” was adopted by AU Assembly of Heads of State and Government in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, in June 2014.

The Protocol extends the jurisdiction of the yet to be established African Court of Justice and Human Rights (ACJHR) to try crimes under international law and transnational crimes, meaning that, if and when the new court becomes operational, the international criminal law section of the court will serve as an African regional criminal court, operating in a manner akin to the International Criminal Court (ICC) but within a narrowly defined geographical scope, and over an expanded list of crimes.

The two-day consultation, which is on the theme “Understanding the Malabo Protocol: The potential, the pitfalls and the way forward”, is organized by Amnesty International, IHRDA, RADDHO, and TrustAfrica.

The CAADP Non-State-Actors Coalition (CNC) in collaboration with TrustAfrica, is currently accepting applications from suitable consultant(s) to carry out a study on Assessing private sector investments and opportunities for improved smallholder agriculture policies in Africa.” The project seeks to identify knowledge gaps on public and private sector investments in Africa within the context of CAADP goals at the national and continental levels. It specifically aims to address the lack of in-depth research, data and analysis on the patterns, dynamics, actors, channels, magnitude, and development impacts of the different modes of private sector investments on smallholder farmers, local investment and value chains development. The research will identify the opportunities of private sector investments to support smallholder farming, including women and youth. This will contribute to expand the evidence base to inform non-state actors’ policy advocacy action in demanding inclusive and equitable investments in African smallholder agriculture.

Purpose of the Terms of Reference

The purpose of this TOR is to seek proposals from suitable organizations, individuals and/or consortia to undertake research to assess the extent, impact and opportunities of private sector investments for smallholders, especially, the national processes championed by the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Africa (NAFSN), with the aim of strengthening local private sector and how NSAs can engage private sector investments to ensure smallholder inclusion.  

Madrasa Early Childhood Programme- Kenya’s (MECPK) reading for Comprehension (RFC) innovation, implemented in the Mombasa Kilifi, and Kwale counties of costal Kenya is an early learning innovation which supports the use of local languages, engagement of community stakeholders, peer learning processes, adaptation of ICTs and the use of creative and artistic modalities, in the promotion of a reading culture, through mobile libraries and a teacher mentoring system. As a result, reading scores of children have increased, both reading and assessment methodology has improved, with an increased trust from parents on the teachers. This is the story of Madam Fatuma Shighi Maliso who has rekindle her joy for teaching, with a revived faith in her students at Taqwa school, a direct outcome of MECP-K’s RFC innovation.

Link Community Development, Uganda (LCDU) works with teachers, communities, parents, and the Ministry of Education to better understand how best to improve literacy levels and to implement the government policy, of mother-tongue instruction. Learning outcome are raised through context-specific strategies and learning innovations. As a result, teachers adapt tasks based on the needs of the students, create locally accessible learning materials, children’s writing and reading have improved, and trust between the community and school has also increased. This is the story of Patience Angela, who, a result of LCDU’s intervention, has developed high competence in reading and writing, segmenting words in Runyoro, constructing words from clusters of sounds and reading with understanding.

Download the Communique Here

A Call to Action

In this communiqué, the undersigned Non-State Actors (civil society,pastoralist, research, private, farmers’ unions and other stakeholders) champion a call to action and outline recommendations on livestock policy advocacy strategies that take into consideration the unique conditions and opportunities of the livestock sector development in Tanzania.

Summary

The livestock sector is an engine of economic growth in Tanzania where 50 percent of households in the country rely on some form of livestock for part, or all of their income.1
Tanzania has the third largest livestock population on the African continent after Ethiopia and Sudan and while a variety of livestock products - including livestock, meat, poultry, eggs and leather goods - are produced in Tanzania, the country continues to depend on imports to meet the growing demand.

Today, more than ever, the livestock sector warrants close consideration and attention if the country is to fully realize its potential as a driver for inclusive transformational growth. The livestock sector is seen to contribute to the Tanzania Development Vision (TDV) 2025 and a recent analysis found that the sector has contributed between 7.4% to 10% of the national GDP,2 although the sector’s development budget remains small, shrinking in recent years to 10.6 billion Tsh in 2016/17.3 Livestock is a sector that is growing and transforming rapidly and the demand for animal products and bi-products is rising, driven by higher disposable incomes of the growing middle class and increasing rates of urbanization. Its potential contribution to achieving many of the national development goals represents a unique opportunity for far-reaching transformation. 

Ndeye Khady Faye joined TrustAfrica in May 2013 as an intern in the operations unit, she was recruited as the administrative assistant in July 2016. Prior to joining TrustAfrica, she held administrative assistant positions at Transrail and Dakar Port. She holds a bachelor degree in Logistics and Transports and is currently completing her Master’s degree in Human Resources at Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar.

Chinedu Yves Nwagu is TrustAfrica’s Project Director for the Nigeria Anti-Corruption and Criminal Justice Fund. For over a decade now, he has worked actively on issues of justice sector reform in Nigeria. Prior to joining TrustAfrica, Chinedu worked as Programme Manager with CLEEN Foundation, Abuja, where he focused on elections, criminal justice and accountability of law enforcement agencies. He also previously worked with Access to Justice, Lagos, where he implemented programmes around judicial integrity, human rights and the rule of law. He has facilitated trainings and collaborated with government officials, security agencies, civil society organisations and development partners on these issues. Chinedu trained as a lawyer and is called to the Nigerian Bar. He also holds a Masters of Laws (LLM) in Human Rights and Democratization in Africa from University of Pretoria.

Ese Emerhi is the project director for the Kiisi Trust Fund.  She has spent the last 18 years working in the international development field, supporting human rights defenders and organizations in the Middle East and North Africa region to encourage civil society in pushing forward democratic initiatives that promote freedom and the respect of human rights, as well as working with youth-led organizations in the US and Nigeria advocating for greater youth inclusion in development projects, leadership and youth empowerment. Prior to joining TrustAfrica, Ese worked as the Advocacy Program Manager for PIND Foundation, developing and implementing a robust advocacy strategy of engagement for state and federal government in advancing economic development for the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. While at PIND Foundation, Ese was also instrumental in designing strategy and implementation for NDLink, an online advocacy and communications platform for development practitioners in the Niger Delta - currently ranked as one of the top 5 online platforms for development in Nigeria. Ese holds a B.A. in Political Science from The Ohio State University and has attended several professional trainings in the U.S.

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