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Dr Tendai Murisa

2nd Executive Director of TrustAfrica

On behalf of the Board of Trustees of TrustAfrica, it is my great pleasure to announce that Dr. Tendai Murisa will become the Executive Director of TrustAfrica, starting from October 2014.

We are very delighted to have found a leader who brings considerable intellectual acumen, energy and deep commitment to the vision, mission, values and principles that undergird the work of TrustAfrica.

The selection of Dr. Murisa comes after a very broad international search, handled by the firm Perrett Laver and overseen by the Leadership Transition Committee of the TrustAfrica Board. He was selected from a pool of over 300 applicants from within and outside Africa. The search process also involved input from many of TrustAfrica’s partner organizations, and we are grateful to them for that.

Dr. Murisa is currently the Director of Programs at TrustAfrica and also coordinates TrustAfrica’s work on illicit financial flows from Africa and agriculture advocacy. He holds a BSc in Political Science and Administration from the University of Zimbabwe, an MA in Development Studies from the University of Leeds in the UK, and a PhD in Development Studies from Rhodes University. Dr Murisa began his career in 1998 with the University of Zimbabwe as a researcher at the Poverty Reduction Forum before moving to Africa 2000 as a Projects Manager, and subsequently to the African Institute for Agrarian Studies as Regional Program Manager in 2005. He has published widely in international journals on African development issues, and steered many partnership efforts for inclusive development in Africa.

Last modified on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 11:48

Article from Inside Philanthropy

There are a lot of problems that ail the African continent. Extreme poverty, conflict, water and sanitation issues, and food insecurity are all concerns that receive a good deal of attention from funders and NGOs. Corruption, too, has been a major focus of grantmaking that we've written about here. 

But one niche in the corruption field that we haven't talked about much is illicit financial flows. The Ford Foundation is among those funders that care about Africa’s dirty money problem, and it recently made a $3 million grant to back TrustAfrica’s advocacy efforts in this area. 

By Sue-Lynn Moses

Last modified on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 11:51

Published in allAfrica.com

Briggs Bomba calls for domestic resources to be mobilized to bring about inclusive development in Africa, in particular by stopping the illicit flow of money out of the continent.

TrustAfrica’s Fund to advance International Criminal Justice in Africa seeks to engage civil society, as well as scholars, legal advocates, and state authorities, to develop innovative strategies to improve accountability for crimes committed.  To help achieve this objective, most recently, TrustAfrica was the primary donor for the first ever National War Victims’ Conference in Uganda.  The conference was facilitated by TrustAfrica grantee African Youth Initiative Network (AYINET), an independent Ugandan NGO that has been working for the last nine years on projects that seek response to and redress for serious crimes and harms resulting from armed violence.  

Last modified on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 11:54

“It’s not a matter of numbers, it’s a matter of conception, a matter of understanding substantive equality and the power dynamic in society. In many parts of the African continent we come from a patriarchal structure and that flows out into everyday life. Philanthropy and power can’t be delinked from the issue of identity, and whose identity allows them to have a bigger say is critical.”

By Chris de la Torre

When you ask Halima Mahomed if women indeed represent 70% of the world’s poor, she’ll tell you not to be worried so much with the exact number, but rather to acknowledge that women do make up the majority of those who bear the brunt of poverty, discrimination and marginalisation. Mahomed attributes this to an imbalance of power, admitting the need for a more activist agenda that puts women in decision making positions both personally and in society.

 

39_Halima_Mahomed

Photo courtesy Alliance magazine

 

TrustAfrica, the Working Group of Philanthropy for Social Justice and Peace (PSJP) and the African Grantmakers Network, in collaboration with the Global Fund for Community Foundations and the Arab Foundations Forum are pleased to share three discussion papers that were developed specifically for the convening "Developing a Collective Framework and Agenda to Advance Social Justice Philanthropy in Africa and the Arab Region" which took place right before the bi-annual African Grantmakers Network meeting in Johannesburg, South Africa in October-November, 2012.  These working papers are part of a broader set of upcoming reflections on social justice philanthropy in Africa.

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