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Philanthropy as Active Citizenship 

Neville Gabriel 
 
A prominent philanthropy platform executive wondered aloud with me whether my commitment to social justice activism could be a hindrance to facilitating the practice of major philanthropists. The worlds of philanthropy and social justice often seem worlds apart. This may be one of the strongest unresolved tensions that strain the emergence of the field of African philanthropy within a global community of practice: how to do philanthropy in a situation where social and economic justice matters greatly. 
 
The philanthropic sphere has come across as the preserve of an elite set of very smart and well-connected people who quietly and comfortably go about doing great things to make life better for others – often behind the scenes and without causing too much trouble. Philanthropy has, until recently, been identified with an elite club of powerful and respectable people who influence the world positively through big money. 
 
Similarly, activists have seemed like extraordinary champions of social, economic, and environmental justice who held the moral high ground far above the rest of us. Although more troublesome, they were modeled as the elite vanguard in rightness of thought and action for human dignity and the integrity of the earth. 
 
Yet, the biggest fault lines of human progress in the world today are exactly about the capture of social and economic power by elites – of whatever sort. Amongst the greatest contradictions in an increasingly democratized world has been the simultaneous increase in the concentration of power in the hands of fewer people. Even if the concentration of power is shifting poles from North to South. 

In September 2013, the Edmond de Rothschild Foundations hosted the first Global South philanthropy platform, Empowering Families for Innovative Philanthropy (ERFIP) in Megève, France. ERFIP is a distinctively unique platform, which brings together philanthropists and practitioners from emerging economies to share best practices, successful models and challenges for peer review and feedback.
 
ERFIP focused on identifying philanthropists and professionals whose work has significant impact in their respective communities but are not seen enough on the conference circuits. The aim of this report is to give a sense of the driving force behind the giving and philanthropy in the three regions: Africa, Asia and the Arab region. It is hoped that such thorough understanding of the underlying factors for giving and philanthropy will help in collection of data that is relevant, meaningful to the sector and contributes to better representation of the South within Global Philanthropy.  To view the report, please visit our Publications database and search under "Research Reports."

http://www.osiwa.org/en/portal/newsroom/803/Illicit-Financial-Flows-in-Africa-Pushing-Billions-of-Dollars-Away-from-Continent.htm
 
Illicit Financial Flows in Africa Pushing Billions of Dollars Away from Continent
Recent study shows integrity institutions lack effectiveness in controlling looting of wealth
 
PRESS RELEASE
 
December 8, 2013 - DAKAR, SENEGAL
 
Contacts: Amanda Fortier, +221 77 644 5186, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; Ibrahima Aidara, +221 77 645 6928, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; Clark Gascoigne, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Economies in Africa have lost between $597 billion and $1.4 trillion in net resource transfers in the past three decades, despite the growth in integrity institutions on the continent, according to a recent study conducted by Global Financial Integrity (GFI).  Illicit financial flows are the topic of a two-day forum organized by the Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) and TrustAfrica on December 9th and 10th, at Terrou Bi Hotel in Dakar, Senegal.

The National Victims' Conference will take place in May 2014 in Kampala, Uganda. In preparation for the national conference, AYINET is organizing a series of victim consultations in the different conflict affected regions of Uganda, beginning with this week's meeting in Lira. A schedule of the consultations is included below.  Learn more about the first consultation on their Website here.

“Nearly 240 million Africans are malnourished and although only one-third of those who face hunger are based in Africa, the percentage of people who suffer from hunger here is higher than in any other region of the world,” stated Mr. Charles Abugre Akelyira, Africa Regional Director of the UN Millennium campaign, based in Nairobi.  “We must invest in agriculture not just to feed the current generation but to prepare for the two billion more mouths we will need to feed by 2050. In particular, we have to invest in small-scale agriculture, as part of our mixed strategy.  Two-thirds of our farm outputs come from small farmers,” he said.

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 November 2013 14:32

Policymakers, development partners, researchers and entrepreneurs in Kenya and elsewhere are sure to benefit from the information contained in a new book entitled “Public Policy and Enterprise Development in Kenya.”  The publication, a result of research produced through the Investment Climate and Business Environment research fund, documents case study strategies for enterprise development in Kenya based on three key areas; public policy and stakeholder involvement; corporate support and capacity development; and entrepreneurial support and leadership. 

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