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Les victimes de la crise malienne ne bénéficieront pas du Fonds au Profit des victimes disponible à la CPI

Dans le cadre de la semaine des victimes qui se tient au Centre International de Conférence de Bamako (CICB) du 20 au 25 Juin 2016, la COMADDH et ses partenaires ont réuni les victimes de la crise malienne et les experts afin d’échanger sur le fonds au profit des victimes qui se trouve au niveau de la CPI.

Cette rencontre est organisée par la COMADDH dans le cadre de la commémoration de la journée mondiale des Nations Unies pour le soutien aux victimes. Plusieurs sujets relatifs aux droits des victimes de la crise malienne sont au menu. Parmi ces sujets, le fonds au profit des victimes.

La conférence sur les fonds au profit des victimes a pour objectif de cerner les différents fonds au profit des victimes. De façon spécifique, elle permettra, notamment aux victimes de connaitre l’existence de fonds au profit des victimes, de partager ses objets, les groupes cibles éligibles, les critères et conditions d’accès ainsi que les modalités de fonctionnement desdits fonds.

The story behind the well: A case study of successful community development in Makutano, Kenya
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In August 2010, following the post-election violence of 2008, Kenyans voted overwhelmingly for a new constitution. This was a development of huge importance, not least because there had been many previous attempts to overhaul the old constitution.But the new version was also a far-reaching document, the significance of which in advocating wide-scale reforms – such as offering devolved constituency-based governments, decentralization and control of financial resources and decision making as well as unprecedented space for civil society to hold the State to account – cannot be overestimated. At the same time, translating the ideals of this constitution into reality could be a lengthy and complicated process, given the difficult political context in Kenya..

The Future and Relevance of Nigerian Universities and other Tertiary Institutions
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Higher education is the bedrock of sustainable national development, which encompasses structural transformation of an economy, human capital development, technological innovation, forging of democratic citizenship, social cohesion, nation building, and preserving the earth. Like other countries, these were the reasons for the establishment of universities and other tertiary education institutions in Nigeria.

However, over the past three decades, beginning in the 1980s, in spite of increases in the number of higher education institutions, the sector has been bedevilled with several challenges that have blighted its fortunes and raised serious questions about the role and relevance of Nigerian universities and other tertiary education institutions to national development. The contributors to this book offer authoritative and eloquent accounts of these challenges and explicitly draw out the policy implications on how the challenges can be overcome in order for Nigerian higher education institutions to regain relevance to the developmental imperatives of the country, especially in the 21st century and beyond.

This book will be of great value to students, leaders of higher education institutions, and policy makers in government and the private sector to chart new policy directions to revitalise the Nigerian higher education sector in order to be responsive to the needs of the country and its people, especially the teeming population of restless youths.

Last modified on Thursday, 06 October 2016 13:56

Download the conference publication here

We are honoured by your participation at this our 10th year anniversary celebration conference on philanthropy and Africa’s development. By honouring us with your presence and recognising this significant milestone together with us, you are contributing to the process of shaping our future. As we mark TrustAfrica’s 10-year anniversary we are also unveiling TrustAfrica’s new strategy for the period 2016 – 2020. Our goal under the new strategy is to advance political economic and social justice in Africa by tackling a number of priority thematic issues. These issues which have found expression in the African Union’s Agenda 2063, the African Mining Vision, the African Union’s Transitional Justice Policy Framework as well as the Sustainable Development Goals will be a major focus of the next phase of TrustAfrica’s programming. We are humbled by your support not only today but in the decade that has brought us to this point. We welcome you. Thank you.

Last modified on Monday, 05 December 2016 13:20

By Tendai Murisa, chief executive officer of TrustAfrica.

There is a growing recognition of the role that philanthropy can play in Africa’s quest for equitable and democratic transformation. Until recently, philanthropy (and, more broadly, aid) has mostly been viewed as a form of support given from outside the continent. Indeed, the story of Africa’s liberation and even early post-independence development initiatives would have been very different if it were not for the investments made by a number of philanthropic foundations based outside the continent. However, there is a new excitement in the continent around the possibilities of home-grown philanthropy. Many important strategy documents have been developed about the key role for philanthropy: at a continental level, the African Union’s Agenda 2063; at a regional level, the SADC Industrialization Strategy and Roadmap 2015–2063; and at a national level, strategies such as those in Rwanda.

Since the turn of the century the continent has seen a growth in the number of wealthy individuals (those with an annual income of more than $150,000 or with investible assets of more than $500,000). According to a 2013 report by UBS and TrustAfrica,1 there are approximately 130,000 millionaires across the conti- nent, and more foundations have been established in this period than at any other moment in the history of Africa. Africa’s richest man is estimated to be worth $21.6 billion. Africa’s high net worth individuals (HNWIs) have been making significant philanthropic investments in health, education, entrepreneurial de- velopment and infrastructure improvements, in the process helping to counter the begging-bowl narra- tive that has so strongly defined African development discourse over the decades.

Last modified on Friday, 02 September 2016 17:26

Looking back, Looking ahead: African Philanthropy for Socio-Economic and Political Justice in the 21st Century

As we mark TrustAfrica’s 10 years anniversary we are also unveiling the organization’s new strategy for 2016 – 2020. Our goal under the new strategy is to advance political economic and social justice in Africa by tackling a number of priority thematic issues. 

A lot has changed in the African political, economic and social context since 10 years ago. While the continent has made signifcant progress in reducing the overall level of violent conflict, the resurgence of violence in countries like Burundi, Central Africa Republic and South Sudan point to continuing fragility and the need to invest in building enduring peace. Terrorism and violent extremism have also emerged as a major challenge across the Sahel region, and especially in places like Nigeria, Kenya, Somalia, and Libya. To address this challenge, TrustAfrica works to advance local accountabilty mechanisms to combat the culture of impunity which is at the root of cyclical violence. We are encouraged by the progress made at the continental level to advance post-conflict accountability mechanisms through the African Transitiional Justice Policy Framework and expanded mandate of the African Court on Humans and Peoples’ Rights. While tremendous progress has been made in reversing the scourge of HIV/AIDS across the continent, the devastation from the recent Ebola epidemic exposed the weakness of health systems and the continent’s poor capacity to respond to such emergencies. 

On the economic development front, the “hopeless continent” narrative has been replaced with a focus on “Africa rising”. While significantly more optimistic, this narrative at times over simplifies Africa’s trajectory and overlooks the deep contradictions hidden beneath rising GDP. The fruits of economic growth have largely been concentrated in the hands of a few local and international corporate and political elites resulting in growing inequality. Tax dodging and illicit financial flows by multinational corporations have also limited benefits accruing to African economies. In many instances growth, especially from the extractive sector, has come at the expense of the environment with serious consequences for local communities. 

These fundamental issues which found expression in the African Union’s Agenda 2063, the African Mining Vision, the African Union’s Transitional Justice Policy Framework as well as the Sustainable Development Goals will be a major focus for the next phase of TrustAfrica’s programming. 

Last modified on Monday, 11 July 2016 04:32
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